New batch of informal settlers living in danger zones relocated in Tagum


TAGUM CITY—50 families that have lived precariously along the accretion area of the Hijo River have now moved in to houses that were built on 60 square-meter lots located at Purok 3-G in Barangay Apokon during the official turn-over ceremony held on April 11, 2019. 

Designed by the City Government of Tagum (LGU- Tagum) and approved by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), the duplex houses of the beneficiaries-families are mainly funded by the DSWD through their Modified Core Shelter Program.

Each family was provided by the national government with 70 thousand-peso worth of construction materials and was given a chance to earn Php 226 daily for ten days in a Cash-for-Work scheme presented by the DSWD which allowed a skilled member of the family to personally work on building their home.

The LGU countered the fund outsourced from the DSWD with provisions under its Shelter Assistance Program that included hollow blocks, sand and gravel, galvanized iron, lumber and provided the labor force in fabricating or welding the steel trusses of each of the duplex houses. 

The beneficiaries had been selected based on the tagging process undertaken by the City Housing and Land Management Office, with the barangay officials of Apokon confirming the families as living in the Barangay Apokon- located accretion area of the Hijo River which had been acknowledged as a danger zone.

The payment scheme of the government-funded socialized housing given to the newly relocated members of the community in RTU Village, a relocation site under the ownership of LGU Tagum, is bound to be heavily subsidized by the local government unit.

The turn-over ceremony which was spearheaded by Tagum City Mayor Allan Rellon was witnessed by DSWD XI Regional Director Mercedita Jabagat and other city and barangay officials, LGU employees as well as barangay functionaries. (CIO- Tagum)

Pantawid Focal: Ensuring education


Tibungco, Davao City- “The quality of a person’s life is in direct proportion to his/her commitment to excellence, regardless of his/her chosen field of endeavour,” regional winner of the Search for Pantawid Focal 2019 Education Category, Sally C. Aro believes in this.

For a decade now, Teacher Sally has been serving as Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) Focal Person in F. Bustamante National High School here. Ever since her early days in the assignment, she has committed herself in attending to the needs of the Pantawid beneficiaries enrolled in their school.

Teacher Sally believes that part of her job description is to ensure that the welfare of the parents and student beneficiaries are taken care of. Although she was only expected to receive and sign Certificate of Enrollments of parents and student beneficiaries, she was determined to exert extra mile in her work as Pantawid Focal Person.

Innovating

“I started my journey as a 4Ps Coordinator by planning on how to improve the implementation of the Pantawid Program in our school. I utilized various approaches and techniques for the different concerns of the program,” Teacher Sally narrated.

One particular innovation that Teacher Sally led was the designing and utilization of an attendance monitoring tool to track the status of Pantawid beneficiaries. This tool helps in the timely and comprehensive tabulation of the monthly attendance data of 4Ps students.

Teacher Sally also developed her own system to identify Pantawid beneficiaries in the beginning of every school year. This system also monitors the monthly attendance, completion and submission of Compliance Verification Forms.  With these innovations, she has always been found organized in her job and is prompt in complying with the timeline of submission of documents.

Facilitating solutions

“Our school was faced with a budding problem on habitual absences of 4Ps beneficiaries. As Focal Person, I made an initiative to talk to the parents of concerned students about their absenteeism. I also tasked the students to write a letter promising that they will attend their classes regularly. I also coordinated with the advisers to help monitor the attendance of beneficiaries as well as their academic performance,” Teacher Sally shared.

Teacher Sally also created a means in addressing the discrepancies in school records of beneficiaries. “The school encountered problems relative to beneficiaries who use wrong family names in official documents hence, resulting to a number of unenrolled students in the Compliance Verification Forms. As 4Ps coordinator, I helped them address the problem and referred them to the school registrar for proper processing of required documents.”

Commitment to education

Teacher Sally gives much importance in dealing with parents and students at an interpersonal level. To her, communication is very important to identify the needs and concerns of Pantawid beneficiaries. She takes time to listen to their problems and answer their queries well. Also, she often coordinates with the City Link and Social Welfare Assistant (SWA) to help address the concerns of Pantawid beneficiaries. More importantly, she started to build relationships with the people working behind the program. She makes an effort to ask for feedback as basis for further improving her practices.

Teacher Sally also spearheaded a Pantawid Project within their school named “Gulayan sa Paaralan” with the full cooperation of Pantawid beneficiaries. She even requested some Barangay officials and staffs to be stakeholders and contributors of the said project.

Teacher Sally gives time to enhance her personal effectiveness through submitting herself to undergo trainings. She has attended series of seminars, trainings and workshops where she was able to learn new methods and shared her own best practices as focal person in the Pantawid Program implementation.

Among her workshops are Orientation and Technical Assistance to Pantawid Field Implementers on K-12 Program last April 2016 which was participated by DSWD Pantawid Program field staffs, Consultation- Workshop on Records Management; and Family Development Sessions (FDS), where she shared inputs and updates on beneficiaries’ attendance monitoring, academic status and correct registration of family names.

Despite the demands and challenges she faced with her assignment as Pantawid Focal Person, her inherent flexibility and adaptability at work helped her manage multiple assignments. On top of all these, she is also assigned as Curriculum Head of Grade 7 Level and a subject teacher as well. As an individual that demonstrates commitment to the organization, she sees these responsibilities as stepping stones that will lead to career progression.

Teacher Sally is also determined to let her career be the bridge to help her make the community a better place for people like the Pantawid beneficiaries who need utmost support and assistance.

Teacher Sally is the first regional winner of the Search for Pantawid Focal under Education of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD). This search recognizes the efforts and services of partner stakeholders from the schools and health centers who have been crucial to the successful implementation of the program.

At present, regional Pantawid Pamilya is helping 226,230 families in 43 municipalities, 6 cities covering all 5 provinces, by keeping their children healthy and in school. The program also has 29,070 IP beneficiaries in Davao Region under the Modified Conditional Cash Transfer for Indigenous Peoples (MCCT-IP). (DSWD)

DSWD’s Kalahi-CIDSS joins hands with tribal leaders

MARILOG, Davao City (DSWD XI) – Some 69 tribal leaders from Matigsalug tribe attendedthe Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services PAyapa at MAsaganang PamayaNAn Indigenous People – Community Driven Development (Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA IP-CDD) Ancestral Domain (AD) Assembly at MACOEMADACI Friendship Building, Sito Marahan.

The AD Assembly aimed at providing detailed overview and features of Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA IP-CDD, significant provisions of the Indigenous Peoples Rights Act, and the Guidelines on Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC).

Present were officials from National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP), Philippine National Police, DSWD officers, Barangay Leaders, and the Kalahi-CIDSS Area Coordinating Teams (ACT).

“The Ancestral Domain Assembly, part of the Social Preparation stage of Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA IP-CDD, ensures that any sub-project decided upon by the community, which will be built or implemented within ancestral lands protected and possessed by IP groups should pass approval from the IP group and their leaders. In this way, the path towards empowerment and progress do not trample on other people’s rights,” explained DSWD Regional Director Mercedita P. Jabagat.

Also discussed during the assembly were the roles of the DSWD, NCIP, LGUs and tribal leaders in the implementation of IP- CDD.

The 69 IP leaders from the Matigsalog tribe, representing the sectors from elders, youth, and women, appointed the Community Sub-Project Management Committee (CSPMC), a group composed of community volunteers entrusted with the responsibility of managing the subproject with the technical assistance of the DSWD Area Coordinating Team (ACT).

“The formation of CSPMC ensures that the program provides everyone the opportunity to be heard especially in making decisions for his/her community. IP communities are able to participate in informed decision making for their community sub-projects,” Merlinda A. Paragamac, DSWD Promotive Services Division Chief stressed.

Covered areas of Kalahi-CIDSS IP-CDD in Region XI are Nabunturan, Mawab, Maco, Pantukan, Mabini, Maragusan, Talaingod, San Isidro in Davao del Norte, Kapalong, Sto. Tomas, Caraga, Baganga, Cateel, Boston, Kiblawan, Don Marcelino, New Bataan, and Compstela.

Total Grant Allocation for the IP-CDD implementation in Region XI is Php131, 600,000.00.

Ang programang Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA IP-CDD, gi respeto ang among tribo pinaagi sa pag konsulta sa amoa. Gi himo ming kabahin sa implementasyon sa mga proyekto, ug gi respeto sa programa ang among kulturanhong katungod (The Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA IP-CDD respects our tribe by consulting us, involving us in project implementation. The program respects our cultural rights),” declared Datu Carlito Guinto Sr., Deputy Mayor of Matigsalug tribe in Marilog.

In Region XI, the reported population of Indigenous People in Kalahi-CIDSS IP-CDD areas is 234,902. This inclusive system of IP-CDD empowers the community to build more equity and ownership of the projects.

Kalahi-CIDSS is one of the programs of DSWD that uses the CDD approach to empower local communities to undertake their own development projects by actively and directly partaking in local governance in identifying their community needs as well as taking part in implementing projects that will address these needs.

The Kalahi-CIDSS IP-CDD targets to deliver basic services in IP communities by supporting the implementation of the Ancestral Domain Sustainable Development Protection Plan (ADSDPP), strengthening partnership of local governance institutions and the Indigenous Political Structures (IPS), and building the communities’ resilience to conflict. (DSWD)

IP midwife is 2019 reg’l Pantawid Focal

Brgy. Gupitan, Kapalong, Davao Del Norte- “Through prayer, action, unity and understanding, there is strength to achieve whatever we aim to do,” Brgy Gupitan Rural Health Midwife, Mary Jean I. Sabudan strongly believes in this.

Born of a Mandaya-Ata-Manobo Dibabawon descent, Mary Jean was declared recently as Regional Pantawid Focal under Health Category. She has been serving the Indigenous Peoples in her community for nine years now.

Hard up

“We were very poor. Farming was our only means of living. Since my parents had eight children to feed and support, we really felt the struggle of surviving each day,” Mary Jean recounted.

Even as a child, Mary Jean already devoted herself to strive and study hard in order to free her family from poverty.  She also wanted to extend help to her fellow tribe members who were in the same fate as them.

“I almost lost hope for a brighter future after finishing elementary school. My parents were incapable of sending me to high school, let alone support my college education. But I refused to let go of my goals. I worked as a house helper to support my high school education,” Mary Jean said.

Fortunately, with the determination and effort of her mother, they were able to seek assistance from a National Government Organization (NGO) to help Mary Jean finish a college degree. Mary Jean then finished a course in midwifery and subsequently, passed the board examination. Equipped with her educational achievements and professional skills, Mary Jean returned to her hometown to serve her community, her tribe, and help her family start a better life.  

Volunteer worker

Even with noble intentions, starting out her professional journey wasn’t easy. Mary Jean couldn’t find a job fit to her qualifications in their town. It was in 1998 when she started volunteering in Barangay Gupitan as a community health worker.

“I served the people of Barangay Gupitan where many residents are lumads, despite the difficulty of reaching the area due to harsh roads, impending flash floods, and the looming threats to security and safety of volunteers.” Mary Jean said.

None of these dangers hinder Mary Jean’s dream to help the community in need of her services and that of her fellow midwives, doctors and barangay health workers. They would visit this remote sitio out of sheer sense of volunteerism.

“I may not have received any financial compensation but my heart is full of joy knowing that I have contributed to the good health and well-being of the people that we served.” Mary Jean said.

As volunteer, Mary Jean has formed partnerships with various medical groups such as the Mercy Maternity Clinic and the Malaysian on-The-Job-Trainee Doctors to improve the services they extend to remote areas. “There are times that government support is not enough that is why I thought of asking help from other parties”.

As Pantawid Coordinator

In 2009, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has included all Ata-Manobo and Dibabawanon tribesmen in the Modified Conditional Cash Transfer for Indigenous Peoples or MCCT-IP. With the implementation of this program, Mary Jean had seen great improvements in the lives of her fellow lumads.

“I am thankful to be part of this 4Ps program as coordinator. Through Family Development Sessions (FDS), I am able to impart my knowledge in health and wellness, especially on the importance of a pre-natal check-up.”

Mary Jean also initiated efforts to educate the community about the importance of immunization through FDS. Mary Jean also introduced to them the different health services provided by the government like free vitamins, free medication, free medical examination and consultation.

Mary Jean as a health worker observed that mothers in the community struggle to find a safe and accessible birthing place. Thus, as one of her proudest initiatives, she coordinated with officials of Barangay Gupitan to help establish a birthing facility in the area and was issued a resolution in year 2014.

“For me, being a 4Ps coordinator is not an easy task. One needs to deal with different kinds of people with different levels of needs. As an IP and a partner in implementing the Pantawid Program in the community, I continue be inspired by God’s grace in my work.”

Because of these ‘extra mile’ efforts, Mary Jean was proclaimed Regional Winner under Health Category of the first ever Search for Pantawid Focals.

This search aims to recognize the efforts and services of partner stakeholders from the schools and health centers who have been crucial in the successful implementation of the program.

At present, regional Pantawid Pamilya is helping 226,230 families in 43 municipalities, 6 cities, covering all 5 provinces, by keeping their children healthy and in school. The program also has 29,070 IP beneficiaries in Davao Region under the Modified Conditional Cash Transfer for Indigenous Peoples (MCCT-IP). (DSWD)

80 youth accepted in DSWD summer job

DAVAO CITY (DSWD XI) –At least 80 youth participants have been enlisted to be part of the 2019 Government Internship Program (

DAVAO CITY (DSWD XI) –At least 80 youth participants have been enlisted to be part of the 2019 Government Internship Program (GIP) of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) here.

GIP is a component of Kabataan 2000 Program of the national government which was developed to provide opportunities for in-school youth to have hands-on experience working in various government agencies.

“It is an opportunity for them to learn life skills in the workplace, have a meaningful and productive activity during their summer vacation, and at the same time earn money to augment their family budget for school needs,” DSWD Social Welfare Officer IV Dahlia S. Padillo said.

The implementation of GIP is from April to May 2019 for 30 days and participants will receive a daily stipend of Php 277.50.

Padillo added that during the selection phase, DSWD prioritized interns who are 18-25 years old, member of Pag-asa Youth Association of the Philippines (PYAP), whose family income is below Php 9,000.00, and a family-beneficiary of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program.

The GIP is part of the government’s efforts to strengthen youth participation in nation-building by exposing them to government service, and to serve as a recruitment mechanism for potential public employees.

GIP youth will perform not only actual office work but will also assist in the implementation of DSWD programs and projects. Participants may also provide frontline services in DSWD satellite offices in the provinces, DSWD residential facilities and in local government units (LGUs) with active and functional PYAP, Padillo said.

For 2019, DSWD has 1,360 interns all over the Philippines.

It can be recalled that in the past years, many participating youth have expressed that the internship program was a big help to them as they were able to save some money and learn to value the fruits of their hard work. Padillo expressed optimism that through this internship program more youths will recognize the importance of public service while government can expect younger and more compelling workforce in the next

) of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) here.

GIP is a component of Kabataan 2000 Program of the national government which was developed to provide opportunities for in-school youth to have hands-on experience working in various government agencies.

“It is an opportunity for them to learn life skills in the workplace, have a meaningful and productive activity during their summer vacation, and at the same time earn money to augment their family budget for school needs,” DSWD Social Welfare Officer IV Dahlia S. Padillo said.

The implementation of GIP is from April to May  2019 for 30 days and participants will receive a stipend of 75% (277.50) of the regional minimum salary wage rate.

Padillo added that during the selection phase, DSWD prioritized interns who are 18-25 years old, member of Pag-asa Youth Association of the Philippines (PYAP), whose family income is below Php 9,000.00, and a family-beneficiary of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program.

The GIP is part of the government’s efforts to strengthen youth participation in nation-building by exposing them to government service, and to serve as a recruitment mechanism for potential public employees.

GIP youth will perform not only actual office work but will also assist in the implementation of DSWD programs and projects. Participants may also provide frontline services in DSWD satellite offices in the provinces, DSWD residential facilities and in local government units (LGUs) with active and functional PYAP, Padillo said.

For 2019, DSWD has 1,360 interns all over the Philippines.

It can be recalled that in the past years, many participating youth have expressed that the internship program was a big help to them as they were able to save some money and learn to value the fruits of their hard work.

Padillo expressed optimism that through this internship program more youths will recognize the importance of public service while government can expect younger and more compelling workforce in the next generation. (DSWD)

DSWD holds first disaster response information summit

DSWD holds first disaster response information summit

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), as the lead disaster response agency in the country, is currently conducting the first Disaster Response Monitoring and Information Center (DROMIC) Summit until April 12th at Pinnacle Hotel, Davao City.

With the theme, “Enhancing Community Resilience thru Innovations in Information Technology and Data Sharing,” the DROMIC Summit 2019 aims to strengthen the disaster information management system of the DSWD by enhancing the knowledge and skills of disaster response personnel. Some of the topics that will be discussed in the event will be on disaster data gathering, monitoring, coordination, information communication and technology (ICT), and data analytics, among others.

It is being organized by the Disaster Response Management Bureau (DRMB) which leads in the management of disaster response information and emergency operations of the Department.

Moreover, the Summit is participated by DROMIC-Central and Field Offices (CO and FOs) personnel, Disaster Response Management Division (DRMD) heads, and representatives from other cluster-members and private agencies.

Improving disaster information management

DROMIC was established in 1994 under Department Order No. 53, otherwise known as the Disaster Response and Monitoring Capability Building (DRAMCB) project, to develop functions and guidelines on the management of disaster information and management.

Among its notable innovations are: Predictive Analytics for Humanitarian Response (PAHR) which is intended to make predictions on potential disaster events to prepare humanitarian response using mathematical theories, scientific processes, and spatial technologies based on current and historical data; DSWD ETDR (Emergency Telecommunications for Disaster Response) which deploys Emergency Telecommunications Teams (ETTs) equipped with ICT resources to address communications, electronics, and information needs of disaster managers and affected population in disaster-stricken areas; and the Virtual OpCen(dromic.dswd.gov.ph), the DSWD’s online facility that provides relevant information to any or potential emergency situation accessible anytime, anywhere, and on any device.

With the rapid changes in weather patterns, the Department, through DROMIC, continues to pursue innovations in disaster response management to engage citizens to acquire and share information on disaster preparedness and to mitigate the impacts of climate change. ### SMS

DSWD Home for Girls and Women obtains Level 3 Accreditation

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Home for Girls and Women represented by its head Sheryll Anne R. Dumalogdog, receives the Level 3 Accreditation Certificate from DSWD Director Mercedita P. Jabagat and Assistant Director Alfredo M. Sy. The Home was also cited national awardee under the Best DSWD Residential Facility category during the recent DSWD 68th Anniversary Awarding ceremony in Manila. (DSWD)

DSWD to continue delivery of its programs and services during election period

DSWD to continue the delivery of its programs and services during election period

The clarification was made following the Commission on Election’s (COMELEC) newly-released resolution dated April 1, 2019 approving the petition of the Department for the exemption of its routine and normal expenses from the prohibition against release, disbursement or expenditure of public funds as stated under Section 262 (v.2) of the Omnibus Election Code. 

DSWD also requested for an authority to continue its ongoing disaster relief, early recovery and rehabilitation efforts, and to undertake possible relief, early recovery and rehabilitation efforts during the election period.

The COMELEC resolution further stated the condition that for programs requiring expenditures, the expenditures are limited to an amount equivalent to one quarter only, for the duration of the election period.

In addition, the Department affirmed that it will not stop its delivery of programs and services to the Filipino people during the elections, and will uphold its mandate to provide effective, efficient, and transparent services.

Lastly, the DSWD also assured the public that it will properly monitor its implementation of programs and services to prevent them from being used by politicians during their campaigns for the 2019 election. SMS