Archive | April 11th, 2019

DSWD’s Kalahi-CIDSS joins hands with tribal leaders

MARILOG, Davao City (DSWD XI) – Some 69 tribal leaders from Matigsalug tribe attendedthe Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services PAyapa at MAsaganang PamayaNAn Indigenous People – Community Driven Development (Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA IP-CDD) Ancestral Domain (AD) Assembly at MACOEMADACI Friendship Building, Sito Marahan.

The AD Assembly aimed at providing detailed overview and features of Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA IP-CDD, significant provisions of the Indigenous Peoples Rights Act, and the Guidelines on Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC).

Present were officials from National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP), Philippine National Police, DSWD officers, Barangay Leaders, and the Kalahi-CIDSS Area Coordinating Teams (ACT).

“The Ancestral Domain Assembly, part of the Social Preparation stage of Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA IP-CDD, ensures that any sub-project decided upon by the community, which will be built or implemented within ancestral lands protected and possessed by IP groups should pass approval from the IP group and their leaders. In this way, the path towards empowerment and progress do not trample on other people’s rights,” explained DSWD Regional Director Mercedita P. Jabagat.

Also discussed during the assembly were the roles of the DSWD, NCIP, LGUs and tribal leaders in the implementation of IP- CDD.

The 69 IP leaders from the Matigsalog tribe, representing the sectors from elders, youth, and women, appointed the Community Sub-Project Management Committee (CSPMC), a group composed of community volunteers entrusted with the responsibility of managing the subproject with the technical assistance of the DSWD Area Coordinating Team (ACT).

“The formation of CSPMC ensures that the program provides everyone the opportunity to be heard especially in making decisions for his/her community. IP communities are able to participate in informed decision making for their community sub-projects,” Merlinda A. Paragamac, DSWD Promotive Services Division Chief stressed.

Covered areas of Kalahi-CIDSS IP-CDD in Region XI are Nabunturan, Mawab, Maco, Pantukan, Mabini, Maragusan, Talaingod, San Isidro in Davao del Norte, Kapalong, Sto. Tomas, Caraga, Baganga, Cateel, Boston, Kiblawan, Don Marcelino, New Bataan, and Compstela.

Total Grant Allocation for the IP-CDD implementation in Region XI is Php131, 600,000.00.

Ang programang Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA IP-CDD, gi respeto ang among tribo pinaagi sa pag konsulta sa amoa. Gi himo ming kabahin sa implementasyon sa mga proyekto, ug gi respeto sa programa ang among kulturanhong katungod (The Kalahi-CIDSS PAMANA IP-CDD respects our tribe by consulting us, involving us in project implementation. The program respects our cultural rights),” declared Datu Carlito Guinto Sr., Deputy Mayor of Matigsalug tribe in Marilog.

In Region XI, the reported population of Indigenous People in Kalahi-CIDSS IP-CDD areas is 234,902. This inclusive system of IP-CDD empowers the community to build more equity and ownership of the projects.

Kalahi-CIDSS is one of the programs of DSWD that uses the CDD approach to empower local communities to undertake their own development projects by actively and directly partaking in local governance in identifying their community needs as well as taking part in implementing projects that will address these needs.

The Kalahi-CIDSS IP-CDD targets to deliver basic services in IP communities by supporting the implementation of the Ancestral Domain Sustainable Development Protection Plan (ADSDPP), strengthening partnership of local governance institutions and the Indigenous Political Structures (IPS), and building the communities’ resilience to conflict. (DSWD)

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IP midwife is 2019 reg’l Pantawid Focal

Brgy. Gupitan, Kapalong, Davao Del Norte- “Through prayer, action, unity and understanding, there is strength to achieve whatever we aim to do,” Brgy Gupitan Rural Health Midwife, Mary Jean I. Sabudan strongly believes in this.

Born of a Mandaya-Ata-Manobo Dibabawon descent, Mary Jean was declared recently as Regional Pantawid Focal under Health Category. She has been serving the Indigenous Peoples in her community for nine years now.

Hard up

“We were very poor. Farming was our only means of living. Since my parents had eight children to feed and support, we really felt the struggle of surviving each day,” Mary Jean recounted.

Even as a child, Mary Jean already devoted herself to strive and study hard in order to free her family from poverty.  She also wanted to extend help to her fellow tribe members who were in the same fate as them.

“I almost lost hope for a brighter future after finishing elementary school. My parents were incapable of sending me to high school, let alone support my college education. But I refused to let go of my goals. I worked as a house helper to support my high school education,” Mary Jean said.

Fortunately, with the determination and effort of her mother, they were able to seek assistance from a National Government Organization (NGO) to help Mary Jean finish a college degree. Mary Jean then finished a course in midwifery and subsequently, passed the board examination. Equipped with her educational achievements and professional skills, Mary Jean returned to her hometown to serve her community, her tribe, and help her family start a better life.  

Volunteer worker

Even with noble intentions, starting out her professional journey wasn’t easy. Mary Jean couldn’t find a job fit to her qualifications in their town. It was in 1998 when she started volunteering in Barangay Gupitan as a community health worker.

“I served the people of Barangay Gupitan where many residents are lumads, despite the difficulty of reaching the area due to harsh roads, impending flash floods, and the looming threats to security and safety of volunteers.” Mary Jean said.

None of these dangers hinder Mary Jean’s dream to help the community in need of her services and that of her fellow midwives, doctors and barangay health workers. They would visit this remote sitio out of sheer sense of volunteerism.

“I may not have received any financial compensation but my heart is full of joy knowing that I have contributed to the good health and well-being of the people that we served.” Mary Jean said.

As volunteer, Mary Jean has formed partnerships with various medical groups such as the Mercy Maternity Clinic and the Malaysian on-The-Job-Trainee Doctors to improve the services they extend to remote areas. “There are times that government support is not enough that is why I thought of asking help from other parties”.

As Pantawid Coordinator

In 2009, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has included all Ata-Manobo and Dibabawanon tribesmen in the Modified Conditional Cash Transfer for Indigenous Peoples or MCCT-IP. With the implementation of this program, Mary Jean had seen great improvements in the lives of her fellow lumads.

“I am thankful to be part of this 4Ps program as coordinator. Through Family Development Sessions (FDS), I am able to impart my knowledge in health and wellness, especially on the importance of a pre-natal check-up.”

Mary Jean also initiated efforts to educate the community about the importance of immunization through FDS. Mary Jean also introduced to them the different health services provided by the government like free vitamins, free medication, free medical examination and consultation.

Mary Jean as a health worker observed that mothers in the community struggle to find a safe and accessible birthing place. Thus, as one of her proudest initiatives, she coordinated with officials of Barangay Gupitan to help establish a birthing facility in the area and was issued a resolution in year 2014.

“For me, being a 4Ps coordinator is not an easy task. One needs to deal with different kinds of people with different levels of needs. As an IP and a partner in implementing the Pantawid Program in the community, I continue be inspired by God’s grace in my work.”

Because of these ‘extra mile’ efforts, Mary Jean was proclaimed Regional Winner under Health Category of the first ever Search for Pantawid Focals.

This search aims to recognize the efforts and services of partner stakeholders from the schools and health centers who have been crucial in the successful implementation of the program.

At present, regional Pantawid Pamilya is helping 226,230 families in 43 municipalities, 6 cities, covering all 5 provinces, by keeping their children healthy and in school. The program also has 29,070 IP beneficiaries in Davao Region under the Modified Conditional Cash Transfer for Indigenous Peoples (MCCT-IP). (DSWD)

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80 youth accepted in DSWD summer job

DAVAO CITY (DSWD XI) –At least 80 youth participants have been enlisted to be part of the 2019 Government Internship Program (

DAVAO CITY (DSWD XI) –At least 80 youth participants have been enlisted to be part of the 2019 Government Internship Program (GIP) of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) here.

GIP is a component of Kabataan 2000 Program of the national government which was developed to provide opportunities for in-school youth to have hands-on experience working in various government agencies.

“It is an opportunity for them to learn life skills in the workplace, have a meaningful and productive activity during their summer vacation, and at the same time earn money to augment their family budget for school needs,” DSWD Social Welfare Officer IV Dahlia S. Padillo said.

The implementation of GIP is from April to May 2019 for 30 days and participants will receive a daily stipend of Php 277.50.

Padillo added that during the selection phase, DSWD prioritized interns who are 18-25 years old, member of Pag-asa Youth Association of the Philippines (PYAP), whose family income is below Php 9,000.00, and a family-beneficiary of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program.

The GIP is part of the government’s efforts to strengthen youth participation in nation-building by exposing them to government service, and to serve as a recruitment mechanism for potential public employees.

GIP youth will perform not only actual office work but will also assist in the implementation of DSWD programs and projects. Participants may also provide frontline services in DSWD satellite offices in the provinces, DSWD residential facilities and in local government units (LGUs) with active and functional PYAP, Padillo said.

For 2019, DSWD has 1,360 interns all over the Philippines.

It can be recalled that in the past years, many participating youth have expressed that the internship program was a big help to them as they were able to save some money and learn to value the fruits of their hard work. Padillo expressed optimism that through this internship program more youths will recognize the importance of public service while government can expect younger and more compelling workforce in the next

) of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) here.

GIP is a component of Kabataan 2000 Program of the national government which was developed to provide opportunities for in-school youth to have hands-on experience working in various government agencies.

“It is an opportunity for them to learn life skills in the workplace, have a meaningful and productive activity during their summer vacation, and at the same time earn money to augment their family budget for school needs,” DSWD Social Welfare Officer IV Dahlia S. Padillo said.

The implementation of GIP is from April to May  2019 for 30 days and participants will receive a stipend of 75% (277.50) of the regional minimum salary wage rate.

Padillo added that during the selection phase, DSWD prioritized interns who are 18-25 years old, member of Pag-asa Youth Association of the Philippines (PYAP), whose family income is below Php 9,000.00, and a family-beneficiary of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program.

The GIP is part of the government’s efforts to strengthen youth participation in nation-building by exposing them to government service, and to serve as a recruitment mechanism for potential public employees.

GIP youth will perform not only actual office work but will also assist in the implementation of DSWD programs and projects. Participants may also provide frontline services in DSWD satellite offices in the provinces, DSWD residential facilities and in local government units (LGUs) with active and functional PYAP, Padillo said.

For 2019, DSWD has 1,360 interns all over the Philippines.

It can be recalled that in the past years, many participating youth have expressed that the internship program was a big help to them as they were able to save some money and learn to value the fruits of their hard work.

Padillo expressed optimism that through this internship program more youths will recognize the importance of public service while government can expect younger and more compelling workforce in the next generation. (DSWD)

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